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Stinkbomb & Ketchup-Face and the Bees of Stupidity is the fourth volume in the Stinkbomb & Ketchup-Face books by John Dougherty, and as we loved the other three books so much, we snapped this one up as soon as it had been published. In fact it’s not even on Goodreads yet it’s that new.

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Our copy arrived on Saturday when I was out, so my son got it first without me having to fight him for it.  He had already finished it by the time I got home yesterday evening and I read it this morning over a long, lingering, Sunday style lazy breakfast.

If you loved the first three books (I’ve blogged about them all on here if you want to find out more about them), you will love this one.  The badgers, who are evil (if you count tipping over dustbins and being a bit naughty as evil), are back in the Great Kerfuffle jail, and plotting to get out so they can go about their mischievous ways.

In the meantime Stinkbomb and Ketchup-Face are ready for adventure.  Unfortunately adventure doesn’t come to their house so they have to go out and find it. They notice that stripey tops from the sport’s shop have been stolen, fairy wings have been stolen, and maybe, just maybe, the badgers in the jail have been stolen?

Or have they?

The usual mayhem ensues, and the characters you know and love are out in full force; the ninja librarian, Malcolm the army (a solitary cat) and King Toothbrush Weasel, who has started keeping bees that look suspiciously like ducks.  There are new characters to enjoy including Ziggy and Wiggo, the badger tracking dachshunds and a group of bandit office chairs who rebelled from their work at an accountancy firm and now roam the mountains aggressively attacking passers by.

The book is utterly silly and utterly splendid, helped along in large part by the magnificent illustrations of David Tazzyman.

As previously mentioned in the other blog posts about Stinkbomb and Ketchup-Face, if you like Mr. Gum, you will love these as they share a lot in common in terms of tone and style and downright silliness.

Suitable for children aged 5 and up, both boys and girls.

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